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17th Infantry Regiment Association

Our Story

This Association plays a vital role in bridging the gap between the past and present by diligently preserving and perpetuating our esteemed regiment's rich history and cherished traditions. The 17th Infantry Regiment boasts a storied legacy, making indelible contributions during conflict and peace. This regiment's dedicated soldiers continue to serve actively in the United States Army, maintaining an unbroken lineage since the outset of the Civil War in 1861.

 

Membership in the Association is open to both current and former members of the 17th Infantry, who share a profound camaraderie that most Americans rarely encounter. This bond is forged through shared experiences of resilience, discipline, and pride cultivated during their service with the 17th Infantry. By fostering an environment of mutual support and understanding, the Association provides a platform for individuals to strengthen their connections, honor their heritage, and collectively contribute to the ongoing legacy of the regiment.

Regimental History

Honors and Lineage

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The 17th Infantry Regiment was initially established on January 11th, 1812, but later merged with the 3rd Infantry and lost its individual identity. However, on May 3rd, 1861, it was reorganized.

 

During the Civil War, the 17th Infantry Regiment served in the Army of the Potomac, specifically in Sykes' Division of the 5th Army Corps. The badge of the 5th Army Corps was a white cross patee, which is depicted in the regiment's coat of arms. This badge is displayed on a blue field above and to the left of the stone wall.

 

At the Battle of Fredericksburg, the 17th Infantry Regiment endured significant losses while assaulting the famous stone wall. The soldiers lay flat on their faces for an entire day (December 14th), positioned eighty yards in front of the wall. The enemy, located in large numbers behind the wall, had sharpshooters ready to fire upon any movement from the regiment.

 

The five-bastioned fort, depicted on a blue shield above and to the right of the stone wall, represents the badge of the 5th Army Corps during the Cuban campaign in 1898.

 

The blue shield below the stone wall features a buffalo, symbolizing the regiment's illustrious history in the Korean War. The nickname "Buffalo" was adopted after Colonel William W. "Buffalo Bill" Quinn, one of the commanding officers during the Korean War.

 

The shield itself is blue, representing the color associated with the infantry.

 

The crest on the coat of arms is a sea lion, derived from the Spanish Arms of Manila, symbolizing the regiment's involvement in the battles surrounding the city in 1899.

 

Lastly, the two arrows represent the regiment's participation in Indian campaigns.

Battle Honors

Civil War

Peninsula; Manassas; Antietam; Fredericksburg; Chancellorsville; Gettysburg; Wilderness; Spotsylvania; Cold Harbor; Petersburg; Virginia 1862; Virginia 1863

 

Indian Wars

Little Big Horn; Pine Ridge; North Dakota 1872

 

War with Spain

Santiago

 

Philippine Insurrection

Manila; Malolos; San Isidro; Tarlac; Mindanao; Luzon 1899; Luzon 1900

 

Mexican Expedition

Mexico 1916-1917

 

World War II

Aleutian Islands (with arrowhead); Eastern Mandates (with arrowhead); Leyte Ryukyus (with arrowhead)

 

Korean War

UN Defensive; UN Offensive; CCF Intervention; First UN Counteroffensive; CCF Spring Offensive; UN Summer-Fall Offensive; Second Korean Winter; Korea, Summer-Fall 1952; Third Korean Winter; Korea, Summer 1953

 

Vietnam

Counteroffensive, Phase VII; Consolidation I; Consolidation II; Cease-Fire

 

Armed Forces Expeditions

Panama (with arrowhead); Operation Just Cause: 1989-1990

 

Iraq

Operation Iraqi Freedom: August 2005 to December 2006 

 

Afghanistan

Operation Enduring Freedom: July 2009 to July 2010; Operation Enduring Freedom: May 2012 to May 2013

Decorations

Presidential Unit Citation (Army), Streamer embroidered LEYTE

Philippine Presidential Unit Citation, Streamer embroidered 17 OCTOBER 1944 TO 4 JULY 1945

Republic of Korea Presidential Unit Citation, Streamer embroidered INCHON

Republic of Korea Presidential Unit Citation, Streamer embroidered KOREA 1950-1953

Republic of Korea Presidential Unit Citation, Streamer embroidered KOREA 1952-1953

Republic of Korea Presidential Unit Citation, Streamer embroidered KOREA 1945-1948; 1953-1957

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Medal of Honor Recipients

War with Spain

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Private, Company C, 17th Infantry

PVT George Berg

Place and Date: El Caney, Cuba, 1 July 1898

Entered Service: Unknown

Birthplace: Mount Erie, Illinois ( 2 December 1868)

General Order: Unknown

Lieutenant Colonel Haskell and his regimental quartermaster were making a reconnaissance prior to the attack on El Caney in Cuba, forward of the their own lines, when Haskell was wounded by enemy fire and immobilized. His lesser injured quartermaster returned to the lines shouting "The Colonel is shot!" 1LT Benjamin Hardaway and 2LT Charles Roberts along with seven soldiers (CPL Ulysses Buzzard, PVT George Berg, PVT Oscar Brookins, PVT Thomas Graves, CPL Norman Ressler, CPL Warren Shepherd, and PVT Bruno Wende) immediately and without orders, sprang into the open, braving the enemy fire to reach and rescue their wounded colonel. Two men were wounded almost immediately, but remaining five men reached the colonel to drag him to safety. Though Lieutenant Colonel Haskell died from his own wounds, the valiant attempt of these seven soldiers to rescue their wounded leader, served as an inspiration to all the rest of the 17th Infantry.

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Corporal, Company C, 17th Infantry

CPL ULYSSES BUZZARD

Place and Date: El Caney, Cuba, 1 July 1898

Entered Service: Unknown

Birthplace: Armstrong, Pennsylvania (31 January 1865)

General Order: Unknown

Lieutenant Colonel Haskell and his regimental quartermaster were making a reconnaissance prior to the attack on El Caney in Cuba, forward of the their own lines, when Haskell was wounded by enemy fire and immobilized. His lesser injured quartermaster returned to the lines shouting "The Colonel is shot!" 1LT Benjamin Hardaway and 2LT Charles Roberts along with seven soldiers (CPL Ulysses Buzzard, PVT George Berg, PVT Oscar Brookins, PVT Thomas Graves, CPL Norman Ressler, CPL Warren Shepherd, and PVT Bruno Wende) immediately and without orders, sprang into the open, braving the enemy fire to reach and rescue their wounded colonel. Two men were wounded almost immediately, but remaining five men reached the colonel to drag him to safety. Though Lieutenant Colonel Haskell died from his own wounds, the valiant attempt of these seven soldiers to rescue their wounded leader, served as an inspiration to all the rest of the 17th Infantry.

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1LT, 17th Infantry

1LT BENJAMIN F. HARDAWAY

Place and Date: El Caney, Cuba, 1 July 1898

Entered Service: Unknown

Birthplace: Benleyville, Kentucky (17 April 1859)

General Order: 21 June 1899

Lieutenant Colonel Haskell and his regimental quartermaster were making a reconnaissance prior to the attack on El Caney in Cuba, forward of the their own lines, when Haskell was wounded by enemy fire and immobilized. His lesser injured quartermaster returned to the lines shouting "The Colonel is shot!" 1LT Benjamin Hardaway and 2LT Charles Roberts along with seven soldiers (CPL Ulysses Buzzard, PVT George Berg, PVT Oscar Brookins, PVT Thomas Graves, CPL Norman Ressler, CPL Warren Shepherd, and PVT Bruno Wende) immediately and without orders, sprang into the open, braving the enemy fire to reach and rescue their wounded colonel. Two men were wounded almost immediately, but remaining five men reached the colonel to drag him to safety. Though Lieutenant Colonel Haskell died from his own wounds, the valiant attempt of these seven soldiers to rescue their wounded leader, served as an inspiration to all the rest of the 17th Infantry.

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Corporal, Company D, 17th Infantry

CPL NORMAN RESSLER

Place and Date: El Caney, Cuba, 1 July 1898

Entered Service: Dalmatia, Pennsylvania

Birthplace: Dalmatia, Pennsylvania (27 May 1873)

General Order: 21 August 1899

Lieutenant Colonel Haskell and his regimental quartermaster were making a reconnaissance prior to the attack on El Caney in Cuba, forward of the their own lines, when Haskell was wounded by enemy fire and immobilized. His lesser injured quartermaster returned to the lines shouting "The Colonel is shot!" 1LT Benjamin Hardaway and 2LT Charles Roberts along with seven soldiers (CPL Ulysses Buzzard, PVT George Berg, PVT Oscar Brookins, PVT Thomas Graves, CPL Norman Ressler, CPL Warren Shepherd, and PVT Bruno Wende) immediately and without orders, sprang into the open, braving the enemy fire to reach and rescue their wounded colonel. Two men were wounded almost immediately, but remaining five men reached the colonel to drag him to safety. Though Lieutenant Colonel Haskell died from his own wounds, the valiant attempt of these seven soldiers to rescue their wounded leader, served as an inspiration to all the rest of the 17th Infantry.

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PVT, Company C, 17th Infantry

PVT BRUNO WENDE

Place and Date: El Caney, Cuba, 1 July 1898

Entered Service: Canton, Ohio

Birthplace: Germany (17 April 1859)

General Order: 22 June 1899

Lieutenant Colonel Haskell and his regimental quartermaster were making a reconnaissance prior to the attack on El Caney in Cuba, forward of the their own lines, when Haskell was wounded by enemy fire and immobilized. His lesser injured quartermaster returned to the lines shouting "The Colonel is shot!" 1LT Benjamin Hardaway and 2LT Charles Roberts along with seven soldiers (CPL Ulysses Buzzard, PVT George Berg, PVT Oscar Brookins, PVT Thomas Graves, CPL Norman Ressler, CPL Warren Shepherd, and PVT Bruno Wende) immediately and without orders, sprang into the open, braving the enemy fire to reach and rescue their wounded colonel. Two men were wounded almost immediately, but remaining five men reached the colonel to drag him to safety. Though Lieutenant Colonel Haskell died from his own wounds, the valiant attempt of these seven soldiers to rescue their wounded leader, served as an inspiration to all the rest of the 17th Infantry.

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Private, Company C, 17th Infantry

PVT Oscar Brookins

Place and Date: El Caney, Cuba, 1 July 1898

Entered Service: Unknown

Birthplace: Byron, Wisconsin (19 July 1869)

General Order: Unknown

Lieutenant Colonel Haskell and his regimental quartermaster were making a reconnaissance prior to the attack on El Caney in Cuba, forward of the their own lines, when Haskell was wounded by enemy fire and immobilized. His lesser injured quartermaster returned to the lines shouting "The Colonel is shot!" 1LT Benjamin Hardaway and 2LT Charles Roberts along with seven soldiers (CPL Ulysses Buzzard, PVT George Berg, PVT Oscar Brookins, PVT Thomas Graves, CPL Norman Ressler, CPL Warren Shepherd, and PVT Bruno Wende) immediately and without orders, sprang into the open, braving the enemy fire to reach and rescue their wounded colonel. Two men were wounded almost immediately, but remaining five men reached the colonel to drag him to safety. Though Lieutenant Colonel Haskell died from his own wounds, the valiant attempt of these seven soldiers to rescue their wounded leader, served as an inspiration to all the rest of the 17th Infantry.

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Private, Company C, 17th Infantry

PVT THOMAS J. GRAVES

Place and Date: El Caney, Cuba, 1 July 1898

Entered Service: Unknown

Birthplace: Milton, Indiana (29 September 1866)

General Order: 22 June 1899

Lieutenant Colonel Haskell and his regimental quartermaster were making a reconnaissance prior to the attack on El Caney in Cuba, forward of the their own lines, when Haskell was wounded by enemy fire and immobilized. His lesser injured quartermaster returned to the lines shouting "The Colonel is shot!" 1LT Benjamin Hardaway and 2LT Charles Roberts along with seven soldiers (CPL Ulysses Buzzard, PVT George Berg, PVT Oscar Brookins, PVT Thomas Graves, CPL Norman Ressler, CPL Warren Shepherd, and PVT Bruno Wende) immediately and without orders, sprang into the open, braving the enemy fire to reach and rescue their wounded colonel. Two men were wounded almost immediately, but remaining five men reached the colonel to drag him to safety. Though Lieutenant Colonel Haskell died from his own wounds, the valiant attempt of these seven soldiers to rescue their wounded leader, served as an inspiration to all the rest of the 17th Infantry.

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2LT, 17th Infantry

2LT CHARLES D. ROBERTS

Place and Date: El Caney, Cuba, 1 July 1898

Entered Service: Unknown

Birthplace: Cheyenne Agency, South Dakota ( 18 June 1873)

General Order: 21 June 1899

Lieutenant Colonel Haskell and his regimental quartermaster were making a reconnaissance prior to the attack on El Caney in Cuba, forward of the their own lines, when Haskell was wounded by enemy fire and immobilized. His lesser injured quartermaster returned to the lines shouting "The Colonel is shot!" 1LT Benjamin Hardaway and 2LT Charles Roberts along with seven soldiers (CPL Ulysses Buzzard, PVT George Berg, PVT Oscar Brookins, PVT Thomas Graves, CPL Norman Ressler, CPL Warren Shepherd, and PVT Bruno Wende) immediately and without orders, sprang into the open, braving the enemy fire to reach and rescue their wounded colonel. Two men were wounded almost immediately, but remaining five men reached the colonel to drag him to safety. Though Lieutenant Colonel Haskell died from his own wounds, the valiant attempt of these seven soldiers to rescue their wounded leader, served as an inspiration to all the rest of the 17th Infantry.

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Corporal, Company D, 17th Infantry

CPL WARREN SHEPHERD

Place and Date: El Caney, Cuba, 1 July 1898

Entered Service: Westover, Pennsylvania

Birthplace: Cherry Tree, Pennsylvania (28 September 1871)

General Order: 21 August 1899

Lieutenant Colonel Haskell and his regimental quartermaster were making a reconnaissance prior to the attack on El Caney in Cuba, forward of the their own lines, when Haskell was wounded by enemy fire and immobilized. His lesser injured quartermaster returned to the lines shouting "The Colonel is shot!" 1LT Benjamin Hardaway and 2LT Charles Roberts along with seven soldiers (CPL Ulysses Buzzard, PVT George Berg, PVT Oscar Brookins, PVT Thomas Graves, CPL Norman Ressler, CPL Warren Shepherd, and PVT Bruno Wende) immediately and without orders, sprang into the open, braving the enemy fire to reach and rescue their wounded colonel. Two men were wounded almost immediately, but remaining five men reached the colonel to drag him to safety. Though Lieutenant Colonel Haskell died from his own wounds, the valiant attempt of these seven soldiers to rescue their wounded leader, served as an inspiration to all the rest of the 17th Infantry.

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Medal of Honor Recipients

World War II

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Medal of Honor Recipients

Korean War

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Sergeant, Company E, 17th Infantry, 7th Infantry Division

SGT EINAR INGMAN JR

Place and Date: Near Maltari, Korea, 26 February 1951

Entered Service: Tomahawk, Wisconsin

Birthplace: Milwaukee, Wisconsin

General Order: Number 68, 2 August 1951

Sgt. Ingman, a member of Company E, distinguished himself by conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity above and beyond the call of duty in action against the enemy. The 2 leading squads of the assault platoon of his company, while attacking a strongly fortified ridge held by the enemy, were pinned down by withering fire and both squad leaders and several men were wounded. Cpl. Ingman assumed command, reorganized and combined the 2 squads, then moved from 1 position to another, designating fields of fire and giving advice and encouragement to the men. Locating an enemy machinegun position that was raking his men with devastating fire he charged it alone, threw a grenade into the position, and killed the remaining crew with rifle fire. Another enemy machinegun opened fire approximately 15 yards away and inflicted additional casualties to the group and stopped the attack. When Cpl. Ingman charged the second position he was hit by grenade fragments and a hail of fire which seriously wounded him about the face and neck and knocked him to the ground. With incredible courage and stamina, he arose instantly and, using only his rifle, killed the entire gun crew before falling unconscious from his wounds. As a result of the singular action by Cpl. Ingman the defence of the enemy was broken, his squad secured its objective, and more than 100 hostile troops abandoned their weapons and fled in disorganized retreat. Cpl. Ingman's indomitable courage, extraordinary heroism, and superb leadership reflect the highest credit on himself and are in keeping with the esteemed traditions of the infantry and the U.S. Army.

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Sergeant, Company F, 17th Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division

SGT JOSEPH RODRIGUEZ

Place and Date: Near Munye-ri, Korea, 21 May 1951

Entered Service: San Bernardino, California

Birthplace: San Bernardino, California

General Order: Number 22, 5 February 1952

Sgt. Rodriguez, distinguished himself by conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty in action against an armed enemy of the United Nations. Sgt. Rodriguez, an assistant squad leader of the 2d Platoon, was participating in an attack against a fanatical hostile force occupying well-fortified positions on rugged commanding terrain, when his squad's advance was halted within approximately 60 yards by a withering barrage of automatic weapons and small-arms fire from 5 emplacements directly to the front and right and left flanks, together with grenades which the enemy rolled down the hill toward the advancing troops. Fully aware of the odds against him, Sgt. Rodriguez leaped to his feet, dashed 60 yards up the fire-swept slope, and, after lobbing grenades into the first foxhole with deadly accuracy, ran around the left flank, silenced an automatic weapon with 2 grenades and continued his whirlwind assault to the top of the peak, wiping out 2 more foxholes and then, reaching the right flank, he tossed grenades into the remaining emplacement, destroying the gun and annihilating its crew. Sgt. Rodriguez' intrepid actions exacted a toll of 15 enemy dead and, as a result of his incredible display of valor, the defence of the opposition was broken, and the enemy routed, and the strategic strongpoint secured. His unflinching courage under fire and inspirational devotion to duty reflect highest credit on himself and uphold the honoured traditions of the military service.

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Private First Class, Company H, 17th Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division

PFC ANTHONY KAHO'OHANOHANO

Place and Date: Chup'a-ri, Korea, 31 August 1951

Entered Service: Maui, Hawaii

Birthplace: Maui, Hawaii

General Order: Unknown

Private First Class Anthony T. Kaho'ohanohano distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against the enemy in the vicinity of Chupa-ri, Korea, on 1 September 1951. On that date, Private First Class Kaho'ohanohano was in charge of a machine-gun squad supporting the defensive positioning of Company F when a numerically superior enemy force launched a fierce attack. Because of the enemy's overwhelming numbers, friendly troops were forced to execute a limited withdrawal. As the men fell back, Private First Class Kaho'ohanohano ordered his squad to take up more defensible positions and provide covering fire for the withdrawing friendly force. Although having been wounded in the shoulder during the initial enemy assault, Private First Class Kaho'ohanohano gathered a supply of grenades and ammunition and returned to his original position to face the enemy alone. As the hostile troops concentrated their strength against his emplacement in an effort to overrun it, Private First Class Kaho'ohanohano fought fiercely and courageously, delivering deadly accurate fire into the ranks of the onrushing enemy. When his ammunition was depleted, he engaged the enemy in hand-to-hand combat until he was killed. Private First Class Kaho'ohanohano's heroic stand so inspired his comrades that they launched a counterattack that completely repulsed the enemy. Upon reaching Private First Class Kaho'ohanohano's emplacement, friendly troops discovered 11 enemy soldiers lying dead in front of the emplacement and two inside it, killed in hand-to-hand combat. Private First Class Kaho'ohanohano's extraordinary heroism and selfless devotion to duty are in keeping with the finest traditions of military service and reflect great credit upon himself, the 7th Infantry Division, and the United States Army.

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First Lieutenant, Company A, 17th Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division

1LT RICHARD SHEA JR.

Place and Date: Near Sokkogae, Korea, 6-8 July 1951

Entered Service: Portsmouth, Virginia

Birthplace: Portsmouth, Virginia

General Order: Number 38, 8 June 1955

1st Lt. Shea, executive officer, Company A, distinguished himself by conspicuous gallantry and indomitable courage above and beyond the call of duty in action against the enemy. On the night of 6 July, he was supervising the reinforcement of defensive positions when the enemy attacked with great numerical superiority. Voluntarily proceeding to the area most threatened, he organized and led a counterattack and, in the bitter fighting which ensued, closed with and killed 2 hostile soldiers with his trench knife. Calmly moving among the men, checking positions, steadying and urging the troops to hold firm, he fought side by side with them throughout the night. Despite heavy losses, the hostile force pressed the assault with determination, and at dawn made an all-out attempt to overrun friendly elements. Charging forward to meet the challenge, 1st Lt. Shea and his gallant men drove back the hostile troops. Elements of Company G joined the defence on the afternoon of 7 July, having lost key personnel through casualties. Immediately integrating these troops into his unit, 1st Lt. Shea rallied a group of 20 men and again charged the enemy. Although wounded in this action, he refused evacuation and continued to lead the counterattack. When the assaulting element was pinned down by heavy machinegun fire, he personally rushed the emplacement and, firing his carbine and lobbing grenades with deadly accuracy, neutralized the weapon and killed 3 of the enemy. With forceful leadership and by his heroic example, 1st Lt. Shea coordinated and directed a holding action throughout the night and the following morning. On 8 July, the enemy attacked again. Despite additional wounds, he launched a determined counterattack and was last seen in close hand-to-hand combat with the enemy. 1st Lt. Shea's inspirational leadership and unflinching courage set an illustrious example of valor to the men of his regiment, reflecting lasting glory upon himself and upholding the noble traditions of the military service.

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Captain, Company C, 17th Infantry 7th Infantry Regiment

CPT RAYMOND HARVEY

Place and Date: Near Taemi-Dong, Korea, 9 March 1951

Entered Service: Pasedena, California

Birthplace: Ford City, Pennsylvania

General Order: Number 67, 2 August 1951

Capt. Harvey Company C, distinguished himself by conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity above and beyond the call of duty in action. When his company was pinned down by a barrage of automatic weapons fire from numerous well-entrenched emplacements, imperilling accomplishment of its mission, Capt. Harvey braved a hail of fire and exploding grenades to advance to the first enemy machinegun nest, killing its crew with grenades. Rushing to the edge of the next emplacement, he killed its crew with carbine fire. He then moved the 1st Platoon forward until it was again halted by a curtain of automatic fire from well fortified hostile positions. Disregarding the hail of fire, he personally charged and neutralized a third emplacement. Miraculously escaping death from intense crossfire, Capt. Harvey continued to lead the assault. Spotting an enemy pillbox well camouflaged by logs, he moved close enough to sweep the emplacement with carbine fire and throw grenades through the openings, annihilating its 5 occupants. Though wounded he then turned to order the company forward, and, suffering agonizing pain, he continued to direct the reduction of the remaining hostile positions, refusing evacuation until assured that the mission would be accomplished. Capt. Harvey's valorous and intrepid actions served as an inspiration to his company, reflecting the utmost glory upon himself and upholding the heroic traditions of the military service.

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Corporal, Company F, 17th Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division

CPL WILLIAM LYELL

Place and Date: Near Chup'a-ri, Korea, 31 August 1951

Entered Service: Old Hickory, Tennessee

Birthplace: Hickman County, Tennessee

General Order: Number 4, 9 January 1953

Cpl. Lyell, a member of Company F, distinguished himself by conspicuous gallantry and outstanding courage above and beyond the call of duty in action against the enemy. When his platoon leader was killed, Cpl. Lyell assumed command and led his unit in an assault on strongly fortified enemy positions located on commanding terrain. When his platoon came under vicious, raking fire which halted the forward movement, Cpl. Lyell seized a 57mm. recoilless rifle and unhesitatingly moved ahead to a suitable firing position from which he delivered deadly accurate fire completely destroying an enemy bunker, killing its occupants. He then returned to his platoon and was resuming the assault when the unit was again subjected to intense hostile fire from 2 other bunkers. Disregarding his personal safety, armed with grenades he charged forward hurling grenades into 1 of the enemy emplacements, and although painfully wounded in this action he pressed on destroying the bunker and killing 6 of the foe. He then continued his attack against a third enemy position, throwing grenades as he ran forward, annihilating 4 enemy soldiers. He then led his platoon to the north slope of the hill where positions were occupied from which effective fire was delivered against the enemy in support of friendly troops moving up. Fearlessly exposing himself to enemy fire, he continuously moved about directing and encouraging his men until he was mortally wounded by enemy mortar fire. Cpl. Lyell's extraordinary heroism, indomitable courage, and aggressive leadership reflect great credit on himself and are in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service.

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Private First Class, Company K, 17th Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division

PFC CHARLES BARKER

Place and Date: Near Sokkogae, Korea, 4 June 1951

Entered Service: Pickens County, South Carolina

Birthplace: Pickens County, South Carolina

General Order: Number 37, 7 June 1955

Pfc. Barker, a member of Company K, distinguished himself by conspicuous gallantry and indomitable courage above and beyond the call of duty in action against the enemy. While participating in a combat patrol engaged in screening an approach to "Pork-Chop Outpost," Pfc. Barker and his companions surprised and engaged an enemy group digging emplacements on the slope. Totally unprepared, the hostile troops sought cover. After ordering Pfc. Barker and a comrade to lay down a base of fire, the patrol leader manoeuvred the remainder of the platoon to a vantage point on higher ground. Pfc. Barker moved to an open area firing his rifle and hurling grenades on the hostile positions. As enemy action increased in volume and intensity, mortar bursts fell on friendly positions, ammunition was in critical supply, and the platoon was ordered to withdraw into a perimeter defence preparatory to moving back to the outpost. Voluntarily electing to cover the retrograde movement, he gallantly maintained a defence and was last seen in close hand-to-hand combat with the enemy. Pfc. Barker's unflinching courage, consummate devotion to duty, and supreme sacrifice enabled the patrol to complete the mission and effect an orderly withdrawal to friendly lines, reflecting lasting glory upon himself and upholding the highest traditions of the military service.

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